Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Photography Tips To Make Sharper Images (Part 2: Subject Movement) by: Martin Bailey



If, when inspecting a blurry image, you can see that some parts of the image are sharp (e.g., the ground around a subject’s feet or the road around a moving car), but your subject itself is blurry, it may well be unwanted subject movement. To overcome this, you will need to increase the shutter speed. How you achieve a faster shutter speed will depend on your chosen shooting mode, but you will generally need to either select a higher ISO to make your sensor more sensitive, or choose a wider aperture to let in more light, or perhaps a combination of the two. If you are in shutter priority mode, select a faster shutter speed and your camera will change the other values for you, as well as let you know when it reaches its limits.

How fast you need to take your shutter speed will depend on the subject, but to freeze a child running around a lawn, you’ll probably want 1/500 of a second or faster. To freeze a large bird in "ight, you’ll want no less than 1/1000, and for smaller birds or fast-paced sports, you may need 1/2000 of a second or faster. You may also !nd that you need to introduce "ash to get shutter speeds this high in lower light situations, assuming that you aren’t using blur creatively.  

Related Post:
Photography Tips To Make Sharper Images (Part 4: Moving Subjects) by: Martin Bailey
Photography Tips To Make Sharper Images (Part 3: Focus Error) by: Martin Bailey
Photography Tips To Make Sharper Images (Part 2: Subject Movement) by: Martin Bailey
Photography Tips To Make Sharper Images (Part 1: Camera Shake) by: Martin Bailey 

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